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A Primary & Secondary Source
'The Sacred Unity in All the Diversity': The Text
and a Thematic Analysis of W.E.B. Du Bois's 'The Individual and Social Conscience' (1905)

[Abstract]
  — By Robert W. Williams and W.E.B. Du Bois


Citation:
Robert W. Williams and W.E.B. Du Bois, "'The Sacred Unity in All the Diversity': The Text and a Thematic Analysis of W.E.B. Du Bois's 'The Individual and Social Conscience' (1905)." Journal of African American Studies, 16:3 (September 2012): 456-497.


Online Source:
Initially published at the Journal of African American Studies's "Online First" page (SpringerLink) on 23 March 2011. Only the abstract can be accessed freely online at Springer's site.


Robert Williams' Notes:
1. Du Bois is listed as co-author in order to acknowledge the inclusion of the full text of his originally untitled primary source, which I have designated "The Individual and Social Conscience". As I wrote in the article: "W.E.B. Du Bois (1868-1963) and his words form the core of this article and call for his co-authorship."

2. As per the copyright agreement with the Journal of African American Studies, I can post an "author's revised last draft" version. The digital version available here is the outcome of the journal's peer-review process: PDF file [~379K].

3. With virtually unlimited space for keywords, I add the following to those already associated with the article: Jane Addams, Anna Julia Cooper, Alexander Crummell, John Dewey, Frederick Douglass, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Franklin Giddings, William James, Josiah Royce, and Nathaniel Southgate Shaler.

4. The full text of W.E.B. DuBois' "The Individual and Social Conscience" is contained within the article, both the published and the "author's revised last draft" versions.
— Robert W. Williams, Ph.D.  [Bio]







"'The Sacred Unity in All the Diversity':
The Text and a Thematic Analysis of W.E.B. Du Bois's
'The Individual and Social Conscience' (1905)"

by Robert W. Williams & W.E.B. Du Bois

Abstract
In mid-February 1905 W.E.B. Du Bois traveled to Boston to attend the Third Annual Convention of the Religious Education Association. He participated as a discussant for a general session that addressed the topic "How Can We Develop in the Individual a Social Conscience?" Published in the convention proceedings that year, Du Bois's untitled contribution is seemingly unknown to later scholars who research his thought and activism. "The Individual and Social Conscience" (IASC), as his work may be titled, set forth a dialectic of human difference in which the self-development of a person's social responsibility was crucial to grounding the idea of the basic equality of all. Du Bois utilized a method inspired by the philosopher G.W.F. Hegel but tempered it with the philosophical concerns of pragmatist and Africana intellectual traditions. In addition to the full text of the IASC by Du Bois, the essay presents an analysis of the IASC's religious dimensions, its extension of themes from his earlier Souls of Black Folk, and its intellectual resonances with Africana, pragmatic, and Hegelian philosophies.
Keywords: W.E.B. Du Bois; G.W.F. Hegel; Africana philosophy; pragmatism; The Souls of Black Folk
[End of Abstract.]  



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