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Primary Sources

The Atlanta University Publications
The Atlanta University Publications (AUPs), edited mostly by W.E.B. Du Bois, are highly significant because they represent systematic, social-scientific inquiries into the condition and lives of African Americans a century ago. They are also known as "The Atlanta University Studies."

The description posted with each publication below was copied from the information presented on the title page of that particular text. The U.S. Library of Congress also provides similar details. (You may search the LOC catalog using the search term "Atlanta University Publications", but do not include the double quotation marks in the 'Title' search field).

The University of Georgia Libraries maintains an Atlanta University Publications (AUP) menu page. The AUPs are part of the Libraries' Facsimile Books collection. The texts are both searchable and readable online in the DjVu format (see Viewing DjVu details below).

The W.E.B. Du Bois Library, at the University of Massachu­setts Amherst, provides many of the AUP works online. Visit the Library's Digital Du Bois page. Their files are in Adobe PDF format. (To obtain the free software for reading PDF files, visit the Adobe web site).

This web page on the Atlanta University Studies is organized into several sections:
  * Primary AUP Texts & Related Materials
  * Reviews and Notices
  * Related Primary Works by Du Bois
  * Contemporary Secondary Sources
  * Colleagues and Contemporaries of Du Bois
  * Sources on Atlanta University
  * Later Secondary Sources
  * Viewing DjVu
Robert W. Williams, Ph.D.  [Bio]




LATEST UPDATE (As of 1 August 2014)
A Later Secondary Source
Posted below is a link to Born and Bred: The Making of a 21st Century College-Bred African-American: A Reexamination of Atlanta University's 1910 Study "The College-Bred Negro American" Edited by W. E. B. Du Bois, Ph.D., and Augustus Granville Dill, A.M., which is a Master's thesis written by Michael E. Carter, University of South Florida (2007).




THE PRIMARY TEXTS AND RELATED MATERIALS
The AUPs and the Credo Online Repository
    "Atlanta University" is a frequent keyword among the Du Bois Collection of primary and secondary materials which are archived at the University of Massachusetts Amherst library and which can be located via the Credo online repository.
    However, searching for either the keyword "Atlanta University Study" [search via Credo] or the keyword "Atlanta University publication" [search via Credo] will yield a smaller subset of (good) results, especially correspondence.
    So far, only a part of the Du Bois collection is accessible online. But more items are made digitally available on a regular basis. In addition, only the metadata description can be searched, not the items themselves. I have provided more information at my intra-site About page.
Credo (Special Collections and University Archives, W.E.B. Du Bois Library at the University of Massachusetts Amherst)
http://credo.library.umass.edu/
No. 1: Mortality Among Negroes in Cities. 1896 [First edition: unabridged].
No editor listed. Proceedings of the Conference for Investigations of City Problems held at Atlanta University, May 26-27, 1896. Atlanta, GA: Atlanta University Press, 1896.
Note: Although this volume is not a primary source of DuBois', it is useful for its understanding of health issues at the time and because it resulted from the first in a series of Atlanta University conferences ultimately (co-)edited by Du Bois.
At the W.E.B. Du Bois Library, University of Massachusetts Amherst
http://www.library.umass.edu/spcoll/digital/dubois/dubois1.pdf
At the Internet Archive's Text Archive in several formats (including DjVu)
http://www.archive.org/details/mortalityamongne00conf
[Note: The wrong publication date is listed on this IA download page.]
No. 1: Mortality Among Negroes in Cities. 1903: Second Ed.--Abridged.
Edited by Thomas N. Chase. Proceedings of the Conference for Investigations of City Problems held at Atlanta University, May 26-27, 1896. Atlanta, GA: Atlanta University Press, 1903 [2nd edition].
[See "Note" for the unabridged first edition of AUP No. 1 (above).]
History of Medicine Division, National Library of Medicine
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/bv.fcgi?rid=history.chapter.115
At The University of Georgia Libraries
http://fax.libs.uga.edu/E185x5xA881p/aup01/  [DjVu format; see Viewing DjVu]
No. 2: Social and Physical Condition Of Negroes in Cities. 1897.
No editor(s) listed. Report of an Investigation under the Direction of Atlanta University: And Proceedings of the Second Conference for the Study of Problems Concerning Negro City Life, Held at Atlanta University, May 25-26, 1897. Atlanta, GA. Atlanta University Press. 1897.
At The University of Georgia Libraries
http://fax.libs.uga.edu/E185x5xA881p/aup02/  [DjVu format; see Viewing DjVu]
At the W.E.B. Du Bois Library, University of Massachusetts Amherst
http://www.library.umass.edu/spcoll/digital/dubois/dubois2.pdf
At Google Books [as PDF file]
http://books.google.com/...id=dEYUDoW38_EC  [the About-This-Book Page]
At the Internet Archive's Text Archive in several formats (including DjVu)
http://www.archive.org/details/socialphysical00atlarich   [Another Copy]
No. 3: Some Efforts of American Negroes For their Own Social Betterment. 1898.
Edited by W. E. Burghardt Du Bois. Report of an Investigation under the Direction of Atlanta University; Together with the Proceedings of the Third Conference for the Study of the Negro Problems, held at Atlanta University, May 25-26, 1898. Atlanta, GA. Atlanta University Press, 1898.
At Documenting the American South, University of North Carolina
http://docsouth.unc.edu/church/duboisau/menu.html
At The University of Georgia Libraries
http://fax.libs.uga.edu/E185x5xA881p/aup03  [DjVu format; see Viewing DjVu]
At the W.E.B. Du Bois Library, University of Massachusetts Amherst
http://www.library.umass.edu/spcoll/digital/dubois/dubois3.pdf
No. 4. The Negro in Business. 1899.
Edited by W. E. Burghardt Du Bois. A report of a social study made under the direction of Atlanta university; together with the proceedings of the fourth Conference for the study of the Negro problems, held at Atlanta university, May 30-31, 1899. Atlanta, GA. Atlanta University Press, 1899.
At the W.E.B. Du Bois Library, University of Massachusetts Amherst
http://www.library.umass.edu/spcoll/digital/dubois/dubois4.pdf
At Google Books [as PDF file]
http://books.google.com/...id=vNA8AAAAIAAJ  [the About-This-Book Page]
No. 5. The College-bred Negro. 1900.
Edited by W. E. Burghardt Du Bois. Report of a Social Study Made under the Direction of Atlanta University; Together with the Proceedings of the Fifth Conference for the Study of the Negro Problems, Held at Atlanta University, May 29-30, 1900. Atlanta University Press. Atlanta, Georgia. 1900.
At The University of Georgia Libraries
http://fax.libs.uga.edu/E185x5xA881p/aup05  [DjVu format; see Viewing DjVu]
At Google Books [as PDF file]
http://books.google.com/...id=qm42AAAAMAAJ  [the About-This-Book Page]
At the Internet Archive's Text Archive in several formats (including DjVu)
http://www.archive.org/details/collegebrednegror00dubo
No. 5. The College-bred Negro. 1902: 2nd Abridged Edition.
Report of a Social Study made under the Direction of Atlanta University in 1900. Edited by W. E. Burghardt DuBois. Ph. D., Corresponding Secretary of the Conference. Second Abridged Edition. Atlanta University Press. Atlanta, Georgia. 1902.
 [The following note was placed on the bottom of page 5 of the text:
 "Note.--The demand for the original edition of the College-bred Negro having exhausted the copies at hand, the present abridged edition has been issued for further distribution. It contains most of the essential facts of the original edition, omitting many of the statisticaI tables and much of the personal testimony."]
At the Internet Archive's Text Archive in several formats (including DjVu)
http://www.archive.org/details/collegebrednegro00dubo
No. 6. The Negro Common School. 1901.
Edited by W. E. Burghardt Du Bois. Report of a social study made under the direction of Atlanta university; together with the proceedings of the sixth Conference for the study of the Negro problems, held at Atlanta university on May 28th, 1901. Atlanta, GA: Atlanta University Press. 1901.
At The University of Georgia Libraries
http://fax.libs.uga.edu/E185x5xA881p/aup06  [DjVu format; see Viewing DjVu]
No. 7. The Negro Artisan. 1902.
Edited by W. E. Burghardt Du Bois. Report of a social study made under the direction of Atlanta university; together with the proceedings of the seventh Conference for the study of the Negro problems, held at Atlanta university on May 27th, 1902. Atlanta University Press, Atlanta, GA. 1902.
At The University of Georgia Libraries
http://fax.libs.uga.edu/E185x5xA881p/aup07  [DjVu format; see Viewing DjVu]
At the W.E.B. Du Bois Library, University of Massachusetts Amherst
http://www.library.umass.edu/spcoll/digital/dubois/dubois7.pdf
At the Internet Archive's Text Archive in several formats (including DjVu)
http://www.archive.org/details/negroartisan00duborich   [Another Copy]
No. 8. The Negro Church. 1903.
Edited by W. E. Burghardt Du Bois. Report of a Social Study Made under the Direction of Atlanta University; Together with the Proceedings of the Eighth Conference for the Study of the Negro Problems, held at Atlanta University, May 26th, 1903. Atlanta University Press, Atlanta, GA. 1903.
At The University of Georgia Libraries
http://fax.libs.uga.edu/E185x5xA881p/aup08  [DjVu format; see Viewing DjVu]
At Documenting the American South, University of North Carolina
http://docsouth.unc.edu/church/negrochurch/menu.html
At the W.E.B. Du Bois Library, University of Massachusetts Amherst
http://www.library.umass.edu/spcoll/digital/dubois/dubois8.pdf
At the Internet Archive's Text Archive in several formats (including DjVu)
http://www.archive.org/details/negrochurchrepor00dubo
No. 9. Some Notes on Negro Crime, Particularly in Georgia. 1904.
Edited by W. E. Burghardt Du Bois. Report of a social study made under the direction of Atlanta University; together with the Proceedings of the Ninth Conference for the study of the Negro problems, held at Atlanta University, May 24, 1904. Atlanta University Press, Atlanta, GA. 1904.
At The University of Georgia Libraries
http://fax.libs.uga.edu/E185x5xA881p/aup09  [DjVu format; see Viewing DjVu]
At the W.E.B. Du Bois Library, University of Massachusetts Amherst
http://www.library.umass.edu/spcoll/digital/dubois/dubois9.pdf
No. 10. A Select Bibliography of the Negro American. 1905.
Edited by W. E. Burghardt Du Bois. A compilation made under the direction of Atlanta University; together with the Proceedings of the Tenth Conference for the study of the Negro problems, held at Atlanta University, May 30, 1905. Atlanta University Press, Atlanta, GA. 1905.
At The University of Georgia Libraries
http://fax.libs.uga.edu/E185x5xA881p/aup10  [DjVu format; see Viewing DjVu]
At the W.E.B. Du Bois Library, University of Massachusetts Amherst
http://www.library.umass.edu/spcoll/digital/dubois/dubois10.pdf
No. 11. The Health and Physique of the American Negro. 1906.
Edited by W. E. Burghardt Du Bois. Report of a social study made under the direction of Atlanta University; together with the Proceedings of the Eleventh Conference for the study of the Negro problems, held at Atlanta university, on May the 29th, 1906. Atlanta University Press, Atlanta, Georgia, 1906.
At The University of Georgia Libraries
http://fax.libs.uga.edu/E185x5xA881p/aup11  [DjVu format; see Viewing DjVu]
At the Internet Archive's Text Archive in several formats (including DjVu)
http://www.archive.org/details/healthphysiqueof00dubo
No. 12: Economic Co-operation among Negro Americans. 1907.
Edited by W. E. Burghardt Du Bois. Report of a social study made by Atlanta University under the patronage of the Carnegie institution of Washington, D.C.; together with the Proceedings of the 12th Conference for the study of the Negro problems, held at Atlanta University, on Tuesday, May the 28th, 1907. Atlanta University Press, Atlanta, Georgia, 1907.
At Documenting the American South, University of North Carolina
http://docsouth.unc.edu/church/dubois07/menu.html
At The University of Georgia Libraries
http://fax.libs.uga.edu/E185x5xA881p/aup12  [DjVu format; see Viewing DjVu]
At the W.E.B. Du Bois Library, University of Massachusetts Amherst
http://www.library.umass.edu/spcoll/digital/dubois/dubois12.pdf
At the Internet Archive's Text Archive in several formats (including DjVu)
http://www.archive.org/details/economiccooper00duborich   [Another Copy]
No. 13. The Negro American Family. 1908.
Edited by W. E. Burghardt Du Bois. Report of a Social Study made principally by the College Classes of 1909 and 1910 of Atlanta University, under the patronage of the Trustees of the John F. Slater Fund; together with the Proceedings of the 13th Annual Conference for the Study of the Negro Problems, held at Atlanta University on Tuesday, May the 26th, 1908. Atlanta University Press, Atlanta, Georgia, 1908.
At The University of Georgia Libraries
http://fax.libs.uga.edu/E185x5xA881p/aup13  [DjVu format; see Viewing DjVu]
At the W.E.B. Du Bois Library, University of Massachusetts Amherst
http://www.library.umass.edu/spcoll/digital/dubois/dubois13.pdf
No. 14. Efforts for Social Betterment among Negro Americans. 1909.
Edited by W. E. Burghardt Du Bois. Report of a social study made by Atlanta University under the patronage of the trustees of the John F. Slater fund; together with the Proceedings of the 14th annual Conference for the study of the Negro problems, held at Atlanta University, on Tuesday, May the 24th, 1909. Atlanta University Press, Atlanta, Georgia, 1909.
At The University of Georgia Libraries
http://fax.libs.uga.edu/E185x5xA881p/aup14  [DjVu format; see Viewing DjVu]
At the W.E.B. Du Bois Library, University of Massachusetts Amherst
http://www.library.umass.edu/spcoll/digital/dubois/dubois14.pdf
At Google Books [as PDF file]
http://books.google.com/...id=sKkJAAAAIAAJ  [the About-This-Book Page]
[Starts at digital p. 9 within a 32M file containing AUPs 14 through 18]
No. 15. The College-bred Negro American. 1910.
Edited by W. E. Burghardt Du Bois and Augustus Granville Dill. Report of a social study made by Atlanta University under the patronage of the trustees of the John F. Slater fund; together with the Proceedings of the 15th annual Conference for the study of the Negro problems, held at Atlanta University, on Tuesday, May the 24th, 1910. Atlanta University Press, Atlanta, GA. 1910.
At The University of Georgia Libraries
http://fax.libs.uga.edu/E185x5xA881p/aup15  [DjVu format; see Viewing DjVu]
At the W.E.B. Du Bois Library, University of Massachusetts Amherst
http://www.library.umass.edu/spcoll/digital/dubois/dubois15.pdf
At Google Books [and contained within a 32meg PDF file entitled Efforts for Social Betterment (i.e., AUP 14)]
http://books.google.com/...id=sKkJAAAAIAAJ  [the About-This-Book Page]
[Starts at digital p. 146 within a file that also includes AUPs 14, 16, 17, & 18]
No. 16. The Common School and the Negro American. 1911.
Edited by W. E. Burghardt Du Bois and Augustus Granville Dill. Report of a social study made by Atlanta University under the patronage of the trustees of the John F. Slater fund; with the Proceedings of the 16th annual Conference for the study of the Negro problems, held at Atlanta University, on Tuesday, May 30th, 1911. Atlanta University Press, Atlanta, GA. 1911.
At The University of Georgia Libraries
http://fax.libs.uga.edu/E185x5xA881p/aup16  [DjVu format; see Viewing DjVu]
At Google Books [and contained within a 32meg PDF file entitled Efforts for Social Betterment (i.e., AUP 14)]
http://books.google.com/...id=sKkJAAAAIAAJ  [the About-This-Book Page]
[Starts at digital p. 252 within a file that also includes AUPs 14, 15, 17, & 18]
No. 17. The Negro American Artisan. 1912.
Edited by W. E. Burghardt Du Bois and Augustus Granville Dill. Report of a social study made by Atlanta University under the patronage of the trustees of the John F. Slater fund; with the Proceedings of the 17th annual Conference for the study of the Negro problems, held at Atlanta University, on Monday, May 27th, 1912. Atlanta University Press, Atlanta, GA. 1912.
At The University of Georgia Libraries
http://fax.libs.uga.edu/E185x5xA881p/aup17  [DjVu format; see Viewing DjVu]
At the W.E.B. Du Bois Library, University of Massachusetts Amherst
http://www.library.umass.edu/spcoll/digital/dubois/dubois17.pdf
At Google Books [and contained within a 32meg PDF file entitled Efforts for Social Betterment (i.e., AUP 14)]
http://books.google.com/...id=sKkJAAAAIAAJ  [the About-This-Book Page]
[Starts at digital p. 394 within a file that also includes AUPs 14, 15, 16, & 18]
No. 18. Morals and Manners among Negro Americans. 1914.
Edited by W. E. Burghardt Du Bois and Augustus Granville Dill. Report of a social study made by Atlanta University under the patronage of the trustees of the John F. Slater fund; with the Proceedings of the 18th annual Conference for the study of the Negro problems, held at Atlanta University, on Monday, May 26th, 1913. Atlanta University Press, Atlanta, GA. 1914.
At Documenting the American South, University of North Carolina
http://docsouth.unc.edu/church/morals/menu.html
At The University of Georgia Libraries
http://fax.libs.uga.edu/E185x5xA881p/aup18  [DjVu format; see Viewing DjVu]
At the W.E.B. Du Bois Library, University of Massachusetts Amherst
http://www.library.umass.edu/spcoll/digital/dubois/dubois18.pdf
At Google Books [and contained within a 32meg PDF file entitled Efforts for Social Betterment (i.e., AUP 14)]
http://books.google.com/...id=sKkJAAAAIAAJ  [the About-This-Book Page]
[Starts at digital p. 542 within a file that also includes AUPs 14, 15, 16, & 17]
No. 19. Economic Co-operation among the Negroes of Georgia. 1917.
Edited by Thomas I. Brown. Report of a social study made by Atlanta University; with the Proceedings of the Twenty-second annual Conference for the study of the Negro problems, held at Atlanta University, on Monday, May the 28th, 1917. Atlanta University Press, Atlanta, GA. 1917.
At The University of Georgia Libraries
http://fax.libs.uga.edu/E185x5xA881p/aup19  [DjVu format; see Viewing DjVu]
No. 20. Select Discussions of Race Problems. 1916.
Edited by J. A. Bigham (John Alvin). A Collection of Papers of Especial Use in Study of Negro American Problems; with the Proceedings of the Twentieth Annual Conference for Study of Negro Problems, held at Atlanta University, May 24, 1915. Atlanta, Ga., The Atlanta University Press, 1916.
Note: Although AUP No. 20 states its publication date as 1916, AUP No. 19 has a publication date of 1917.
Contents: AUP No. 20 contains the following essays (most of which were published initially in other places):
*  Frederick H. Means, "A Review of the Atlanta University Conferences and Social Studies" [an original essay];
I.  W.E.B. Du Bois, "Races of Men" [Reprinted from AUP No. 11];
II.  Felix von Luschan, "Anthropological View of Race";
III.  Franklin P. Mall, "Anatomical Characters of the Human Brain";
IV.  R.S. Woodworth, "Racial Differences in Mental Traits";
V.  W.I. Thomas, "The Mind of the Savage";
VI.  Franz Boas, "Old African Civilizations";
[RW's Note: This is excerpted from a longer work by Boas (viewable here).]
VII.  Alexander F. Chamberlain, "The Contribution of the Negro to Human Civilization"; and
VIII.  Franz Boas, "Race Problems in the United States".
At The University of Georgia Libraries
http://fax.libs.uga.edu/E185x5xA881p/aup20  [DjVu format; see Viewing DjVu]
At the W.E.B. Du Bois Library, University of Massachusetts Amherst
http://www.library.umass.edu/spcoll/digital/dubois/dubois20.pdf
"The Atlanta University Studies of Social Conditions among Negroes, 1896–1913." 1940.
This is a draft manuscript of a speech that Du Bois was scheduled to deliver on 10 November 1940 at the First Congregational Church in Atlanta, GA. He sketched the history of the Atlanta University Conferences before he became responsible for them. He then outlined the research goals of the conferences that he coordinated. At the end of the draft he indicated that the First Phylon conference was planned for 1941 and that it would continue the research focus of the earlier A.U. conferences.
    Citation: Du Bois, W.E.B. (1940, November 10). The Atlanta University Studies of Social Conditions among Negroes, November 10, 1940. W.E.B. Du Bois Papers (MS 312). Special Collections and University Archives, University of Massachusetts Amherst Libraries. [Credo Identifier: mums312-b198-i012; Microfilm Identifier: Reel 80, Frames 796-801].
Page facsimiles at Credo (Special Collections and University Archives, W.E.B. Du Bois Library at the University of Massachusetts Amherst).
http://credo.library.umass.edu/view/full/mums312-b198-i012
No. 21. The First Phylon Institute. 1941.
AUP 21 was not published separately, but in Phylon, the journal established by Du Bois at Atlanta University, and was entitled "The First Phylon Institute"  (Phylon, v.2, 3rd Quarter; pp.275-288). The First Phylon Institute was the 25th Atlanta University Conference and was held April 17, 18, and 19, 1941. The publication included (1) an opening statement by Du Bois; (2) a "Program of the Institute" listing activities and speakers; (3) "Minutes of the Meeting"; and (4) a summary and critique of the Institute entitled "The Nature, Scope and Significance of the First Phylon Institute" by Frank G. Davis.
To locate this hard-to-find publication search online sources, such as the Hathi Trust Digital Library, with the phrase "First Phylon Institute"
Hathi Trust Digital Library  [Use the "Full-text Search" option]
Nos. 22-23. Conferences of Negro Land-Grant Colleges for Co-ordinating a Program of Cooperative Social Studies. 1943, 1944.
The First Conference of Negro Land-Grant Colleges for Co-ordinating a Program of Cooperative Social Studies was held in 1943, while The Second Conference of Negro Land-Grant Colleges for Co-ordinating a Program of Cooperative Social Studies was held in 1944. The Atlanta University Press published each as a separate publication.
To locate these hard-to-find publications use an online search engine, such as the Hathi Trust Digital Library, and query the phrases "First Conference of Negro Land-Grant Colleges" or "Second Conference of Negro Land-Grant Colleges"
Hathi Trust Digital Library  [Use the "Full-text Search" option]
No. 24. Negro Business and Business Education: Their Present and Prospective Development. 1947.
Edited by Joseph A. Pierce. New York, Harper, 1947.
[This text has been identified by the Library of Congress as part of the series, Atlanta University Publications, no. 24. See LOC's catalog entry and access the "Text (Full information)" from the "Save, Print or Email Records" menu at the bottom of the page.]
This document is not available online.



REVIEWS AND NOTICES
An anonymous notice in The Nation for 'Some Efforts of American Negroes for their own Social Betterment' [AUP No. 3] was published within the "Notes" section (source: The Nation, v.68, No.1756 (23 February 1899): p.147). The text of the notice is presented here in its entirety and verbatim:
     'Some Efforts of American Negroes for their own Social Betterment' is the title of a pamphlet report of the Third Atlanta Conference for the study of negro problems (No. 3 of the Atlanta University Publications). This document proves once more the useful work undertaken by the University in gathering statistics of social conditions and needs among the black population of the South. Church societies figure largely in the reformatory efforts here tabulated and discussed, along with secret beneficent societies, organized philanthropies, cooperative business enterprises, and the like. In North Carolina, so lately convulsed by race clashings, the richest black man in the State has promoted the building of a cotton mill for his color, and white Northern liberality has been reinforced by black sympathy and aid in establishing a hospital for negro consumptives. In Texas, a former student at Atlanta University has founded a Farmers' Improvement Society, which in one town has made the negro quarter more attractive than the white. This is said to have branches in thirty-six towns, and 1,800 members. There is much other suggestive information in this report.
 Note 1: "Negro" was not capitalized within the notice itself.
 Note 2: Du Bois's name was not mentioned in the notice.
Start Page within Volume 68 of The Nation at Google Books
http://books.google.com/books?id=8QUDAAAAIAAJ....#PPA147,M1
An anonymous New York Times announcement of the upcoming 1902 Atlanta University Conference. It was published on p.2 of the 10 May 1902 (Saturday) issue of the newspaper. What appears to be the full text of the notice is presented below in its entirety:
 Conference for Study of Negro Problems
   ATLANTA, Ga., May 9.—The seventh annual conference for the study of the negro problems convenes at the Atlanta University, Atlanta, Ga., May 27. Booker T. Washington of Tuskegee, William Benson of Kowaliga, and representatives from Fisk, Hampton, Prairie View, and other institutions will take part. W. E. Burghardt Du Bois is Corresponding Secretary of the conference.
 Note 1: "Negro" was not capitalized within the announcement itself.
 Note 2: One can learn more about the now-closed Kowaliga Academic and Industrial Institute, founded by William Benson, by reading Michael Sznajderman's article in Alabama Heritage (Spring 2005). William E. Benson's 1905 essay "Kowaliga: A Community with a Purpose" (Pp. 22-24 in Charity Organization Society, The Negro in the Cities of the North, October 1905) is available via Google Books: start page [another online version].
D. McCowin Reviews the Reprint of The Negro Church [AUP Nr. 8]. 2004.
David J. McCowin. "Review of W.E.B. Du Bois, ed., The Negro Church: Report of a Social Study Made under the Direction of Atlanta University." McCowin reviewed the reprint of the 1903 edition with an introduction by Phil Zuckerman, Sandra L. Barnes, and Daniel Cady. Walnut Creek: AltaMira Press, 2003.
Anon. Review of The Negro American Artisan. 1914. [AUP Nr. 17.]
No author was listed for a brief review published as a "Book Notice" in The Journal of Political Economy (Vol. 22, No. 4 (April 1914): 404). The review in its entirety is presented below:
 The Negro American Artisan. Edited by W. E. B. Du Bois. (Atlanta University
       Publications, No. 17) Atlanta Ga.: Atlanta University Press, 1912. 12mo,
       paper, pp.144. $0.75.
     This is a report of a social study made by Atlanta University under the patronage of the trustees of the John F. Slater Fund. A previous study and report was made in 1902, and issued as Bulletin No. 7 of the "Atlanta University Publications." The present bulletin, dealing the negro American artisan, gives first a very valuable bibliography relating to the social and economic life of the negro. It then discusses briefly such subjects as "The African Artisan, "The ante-Bellum [sic] Negro Artisan," "The Economics of Emancipation," "The Occupation of Negroes," by sections and states, "The Negro and Organized Labor," The Training of Negro American Artisans"," and "The Economic Future of the Negro American." The subjects reveal the nature of the publication. Such studies cannot but render great aid in attacking the perplexities of the negro problem.
 [Note: "Negro" was not capitalized in the original text.]
 [Citation: Anonymous. 1914. Review of The Negro American Artisan, Edited by W.E.B. Du Bois. Journal of Political Economy, 22:4 (April): 404. The journal is available at Google Books: review page; "About-this-book" page.]



RELATED PRIMARY WORKS BY W.E.B. DU BOIS
"The Laboratory in Sociology at Atlanta University" by W.E.B. Du Bois. 1903. Originally published in The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, Vol. 21 (May 1903).
Page on this web site with the full text and annotations
http://www.webdubois.org/dbLabSocAtUni.html
"The Atlanta Conferences" by W.E.B. Du Bois. 1904. The essay was originally published in Voice of the Negro, Vol. 1 (March 1904): 85-89.
Page on this web site with the full text and annotations
http://www.webdubois.org/dbAtlantaConfs.html
"Atlanta University" (1905) by W.E.B. Du Bois; published in American Unitarian Association, From Servitude To Service: Being the Old South Lectures on the History and Work of Southern Institutions for the Education of the Negro (Boston: American Unitarian Association, pp.155-197).
    Du Bois covered the history of Atlanta University, providing details of its founding and biographies of its Presidents Edmund Ware and Horace Bumstead. Du Bois emphasized the importance of liberal-arts education, coupled with a measure of manual training. He also wrote that the Black public schools of Atlanta and of Georgia as a whole have employed graduates from Atlanta University as teachers and administrators -- an important point to emphasize in an era where White supremacists questioned the value of a college education for African Americans. Du Bois also described the Atlanta University conferences thusly:
 And Atlanta University seeks to become a centre for the careful, earnest and minute study of the Negro problems, through the experience and active cooperation of other graduates scattered all over the south. For this purpose we have established a department of social inquiry and an Annual Conference to study the Negro problem; we have been careful not to let the size of the field or the intricacy and delicacy of the subject tempt us into superficial or hasty work. Each year some definite phase of the problem is taken, the inquiry is limited in extent, and every effort is made to get thorough unbiased returns. To establish such a work with few funds, and untrained investigators was difficult, but to-day, after nine years of work, we feel as though the department was permanently organized for efficient work, and that interesting and instructive results will follow its further prosecution. The nine investigations already accomplished make a fairly well rounded study of human life as lived by the American Negro.
     [ . . . . ]
     The results of these studies have been widely used; they are in the chief libraries of the world and have been commended by the London Times, The Spectator, The Manchester Guardian, The Outlook, The Nation, The Dial, The Independent, and leading daily papers.
     While we believe that social inquiry of this sort is fully justified if it seeks merely to know and publish that knowledge, we have also sought in addition to this to inspire our graduates in various communities to use the information we collect as a basis of concrete efforts in social betterment, and we can already point to some results of this policy.
 Note 1 (Online Sources): The entire book is available at the Internet Archive (Search page) and at Google Books (Search page).
 Note 2: In the last line of the quotation above Du Bois wrote that "we can already point to some results of this policy" of Atlanta University graduates using the A.U. conference data for "social betterment". However, he did not provide details in the chapter itself.
 Note 3: The book also contained other essays: "Introduction" by Robert C. Ogden; "Howard University" by Kelly Miller; "Berea College" by William G. Frost; "Tuskegee Institute" by Roscoe Conkling Bruce; "Hampton Institute" by H. B. Frissell; and "Fisk University" by James G. Merrill.



CONTEMPORARY SECONDARY SOURCES
An anonymous note on the issue of African American education that was published in Gunton's Magazine (April 1900) within the section entitled "Civic and Educational Notes". The full text is presented below in its entirety:
  Higher
Education
for Negroes
 Professor Du Bois, of the Department of Economics and History in Atlanta University, is taking steps to find out the practical results of higher education of negroes. It is no uncommon thing in the South to find bitter opposition to even ordinary education for negroes. The argument is that it makes them discontented and unwilling to work at the only occupations open to the colored race in that section ; social distinction restricting them to rough labor and personal service. There is truth in this, yet Booker T. Washington has been proving for several years that negroes who are really equipped with industrial skill, decent habits and willingness to work can make headway and break down prejudice against them, and do not have to come North for that purpose, either.
      Several southern states have tried lately to adopt a scheme whereby only the monies collected from colored taxpayers shall be applied to the education of colored children. Of course this would be a very neat way of depriving negroes of all educational opportunities, but it seems unlikely that southern public sentiment will sustain any such preposterous trick. With reference to higher education the antagonism is more pronounced and outspoken. You will hear it denounced as simply the means of turning out a stream of colored preachers, lawyers and doctors who scorn to touch a shovel or a hoe and become loafers and general nuisances. Cases can be cited that sustain this, no doubt ; but for the most part it is an absurd exaggeration.
      Professor Du Bois now intends to collect data on the subject, so that the truth one way or the other may be known and made available for future discussions. He is sending out blanks all over the country, so far as college-bred negroes can be traced, and to all persons and institutions that are likely to have any knowledge of such negroes. These blanks are to be filled out in detail, showing the early life, occupations since graduation, present occupation, instances of special success, et cetera. Whoever has any personal knowledge of a college-bred negro can help this work along by sending to Professor W. E. B. Du Bois, Atlanta University, for one of these blanks and returning it with the information filled in. If the responses are at all general it will be a very valuable accomplishment. If higher education for negroes is a success, the fact needs to be known and made known ; and if it is a failure that needs to be known too, and more effort devoted to something else.

 Note 1: "Negro" was not capitalized in the original. Also, an attempt was made to preserve the indented quality of the heading/title.
 Note 2: The citation to this notice is: Anonymous. "Higher Education for Negroes." Gunton's Magazine, v.18 (April 1900): pp. 358-359.
 Note 3: This passage was referring to DuBoisan research that was eventually published as Atlanta University Publication No. 5: The College-bred Negro (1900).
I draw our attention to the last two sentences of the piece. The author acknowledged the importance of social-science research whose findings were generalizable. However, what was the "something else" that the author suggested could be pursued if African-American higher education was not a success? Indeed, what would count as success or failure? How might Du Bois have responded to that last sentence?

Download page for the complete Volume 18 of Gunton's Magazine
http://www.archive.org/details/guntonsmagazine18guntuoft  [Internet Archive]
Martha Goode Anderson published her "Atlanta: The Center of Negro Education of the World" in Gunton's Magazine, v.25 (November 1903): pp.433-441. Anderson wrote that "[t]here are several distinctive features that make the Atlanta University one of the remarkable educational institutions of the world." [p.435]. Among those "distinctive features" she included Du Bois himself—printed as "du Bois" in the following quotations:
     A second distinctive feature of the Atlanta University is the presence there of Professor W. E. Burghardt du Bois, who has charge of the Department of Information [sic: Economics] and Sociology. Professor du Bois disagrees absolutely with the plans of Booker T. Washington. While he recognizes the importance and necessity of industrial education for the negroes,[sic] he insists upon educational enlightenment as the path that will lead to the best results for the negro,[sic] giving him that chance which may help him to take his place in quiet dignity side by side with another race. He is poetical, impassioned and fiery, and his writings are having a wide influence upon both black folk and white folk." [p.437]
Anderson conveyed the significance of Du Bois and the research efforts at Atlanta University that resulted in the AUPs:
     Other distinctive features of the Atlanta University are the Department of Sociological Research, in charge of Burghardt du Bois, and the annual conferences held to discuss the condition of the American negro [sic] and to make suggestions for his improvement. The publications of the Southern History Association, of which Dr. J. L. M. Curry was president, and Thomas Nelson Page and Prof. Woodrow Wilson are directors, said in March, 1901: "The very best and most advanced work on the sociological condition of the negro [sic] is being done by Atlanta University, through the courses of study, through its teaching corps, through its publications, and through its stimulus to the negro [sic] conference which meets in that city." [pp.437-438]
——————————
 [Note: The quoted reference to the Publications of the Southern History Association is to an anonymously written note on The Negro in Business, AUP 5 (1899), in the "Reviews and Notices" section in Vol.5, No.2 (March 1901) at p.172.]
Start page of Anderson's article [at Google Books]
http://books.google.com/books?id=CwEoAAAAYAAJ....



COLLEAGUES AND CONTEMPORARIES OF DU BOIS
Augustus Granville Dill (1881-1956)
Augustus G. Dill co-edited several AUPs with Du Bois and then still later worked in The Crisis office as business manager and was a co-publisher of The Brownies' Book. Du Bois wrote in Dusk of Dawn:
     In November, 1913, and at my earnest solicitation, Augustus G. Dill, who had succeeded me at Atlanta University, left his academic work and came to be business manager of the Crisis magazine. From then until early in 1928 he gave to the work his utmost devotion and to him was due much of its phenomenal business success.  
[1940; Schocken Ed., 1968: p.226 (ch.8)]
Dill wrote an autobiographical statement for the Secretary's Second Report, Harvard College Class of 1908 (1914). Dill's own words are presented here in their entirety and verbatim:
   AUGUSTUS GRANVILLE DILL
      In September, 1908, I entered upon the work as Northern Secretary to Atlanta University from which institution I had come to Harvard. My task was to interest friends in the North in the work of Atlanta University. I worked first in New York City, later in Chicago, Ill., Detroit, Mich., and Cleveland, Ohio. I attribute a great deal of the success which I met in this work to the kind cooperation of Harvard men, old and young in all of these places. A good personal letter from President Eliot helped me as nothing else could have done, both with Harvard men and others interested in educational matters. After two years in this capacity, I entered upon the Associate Professorship of Sociology in Atlanta University, succeeding Dr. W. E. B. DuBois, Harvard, 1890, who had for thirteen years held said Professorship, and with whom I had worked as student and co-laborer, and whose intellect, ability and staunch principles had meant much to me, and who, by the way, had been my inspiration Harvard-ward. That position, I held for three years, making five years all told in the service of Atlanta University. During the summers of these years, I worked in the North chiefly in the New England States endeavoring to bring the work of Atlanta University to the attention of friends old and new. I had with me, during these summers, a male quartet from the student body of Atlanta. This method was one of the best possible ways of bringing the work of the institution to the attention of friends in the North, and much of our success in this connection was due to the hearty response and earnest coöperation of Harvard men, old and young, whom I found almost everywhere I went. Indeed, it meant much to me, and to the work of the University to be a Harvard man. The class of 1908, on more than one occasion gave a helping hand. As Associate Professor of Sociology and head of that department, it was my task and my pleasure to conduct, in connection with Dr. DuBois, the sociological investigations in the study of the various problems connected with the life among Negro Americans, which work has been so successfully carried on in Atlanta University for eighteen years past. From each investigation there came a publication. Of these publications, I was joint editor. The publications are as follows: (1) "The College Bred Negro American," 1910; (2) "The Common School and the Negro American," 1911; (3) "The Negro American Artisan," 1912; (4) "Morals and Manners Among Negro Americans," 1913, (now on the press). It is our belief that these publications have been of inestimable value to the student of general social conditions as well as to the student particularly interested in the problems pertaining to the black folk of America. I resigned from this position May first, 1913, resignation to take effect June first, 1913, in order to accept the position which I now hold, that of Business Manager of the Crisis, a magazine edited by Dr. DuBois and devoted to the interests of Negroes. With a Harvard editor and a Harvard business manager, it appears to be giving promise.
[Pp.92-94 (start page at Google Books)]
——————————
   Robert Williams' Note 1 (Citation): Dill, August Granville. [Autobiographical Statement]. Pp.92-4 in Harvard College. Secretary's Second Report, Harvard College Class of 1908, Sexennial Celebration, June 1914 (1914).
R.W.'s Note 2: In the original The Crisis in not italicized in the manner of a periodical title. The "first" in "May first" and "June first" is not capitalized in the original.
For the complicated interpersonal and professional relations between Dill and DuBois as they developed after Dill's arrest for activities deemed illegal in public restrooms see Seth Clark Silberman's dissertation "'Youse Awful Queer, Chappie': Reading Black Queer Vernacular in Black Literatures of the Americas, 1903-1967" (2005), which is accessible via the Digital Repository at the University of Maryland: abstract and PDF file (~4.7 MB).
"Dill, Augustus Granville (1881-1956)," a biography by Susan Bragg, is available at BlackPast.org
http://www.blackpast.org/?q=aah/dill-augustus-granville-1881-1956
"Augustus Granville Dill, 1881-1956" is a brief biographical sketch by Karen Ruffle; it is viewable at a UNC-CH web site
docsouth.unc.edu/church/morals/bio.html
One can search for information related to Augustus Dill in the Bulletin of Atlanta University
http://hbcudigitallibrary.auctr.edu/cdm/search/.../searchterm/Dill/....
Nota Bene: Material by and about George Bradford will be added in the future.



SOURCES ON ATLANTA UNIVERSITY
The Bulletin of Atlanta University was published by the college and documented the people and events relevant to the school. It is accessible online via the HBCU Library Alliance Digital Collection [portal]. The 193 issues of The Bulletin span the years 1888 through 1909. Du Bois was referenced frequently.
Search for "Atlanta Conference" within The Bulletin
http://hbcudigitallibrary.auctr.edu/.../searchterm/Atlanta%20Conference/....
Search for "annual conference" within The Bulletin
http://hbcudigitallibrary.auctr.edu/.../searchterm/annual%20conference/....
Search for "George G. Bradford", one of the early supporters of A.U. research, within The Bulletin
http://hbcudigitallibrary.auctr.edu/.../George%20G.%20Bradford/....
Photogravures of Atlanta University, Atlanta, Georgia (1890) was copyrighted by Horace Bumstead, President of the University, and was published by the Boston Photogravure Company. The book included photos of the training facilities at the school. The photos were accompanied by quotations from various famous authors. Rev. Bumstead wrote the text for the book (as indicated by his named printed at the end of the text itself). Bumstead described the school with the following words:
 THE foregoing illustrations afford only a glimpse of the work done by Atlanta University. The institution gives instruction in every grade of study, from the lowest class in the primary school to the highest class in college. It accompanies its instruction with a training of the hand in the fundamental principles of various trades and industries. It builds up moral and religious character in an earnestly Christian but strictly unsectarian spirit. It seeks to develop a self-reliant and self-sacrificing manhood and womanhood in those who are to be the leaders of eight millions of our people.
     The University has been in operation twenty years, under a Board of Trustees holding a charter from the State of Georgia. In the last sixteen years, it has sent out two hundred graduates from its Normal and College courses. Of those now living, seventy per cent are at present engaged in teaching; while, in the remaining thirty per cent, are to be found successful ministers, lawyers, doctors and business men, together with a number of married women who are training their children in refined and Christian homes of their own. Hundreds of past undergraduates are also doing similar work; while, of the six hundred present undergraduates, as many as two hundred teach vacation schools every summer, and reach as many as ten thousand children. Thus the leavening influence of the University is spread over Georgia and surrounding States.  [Unnumbered pages at the end of the book]
[. . . .]
The entire volume is available at the Internet Archive
http://www.archive.org/details/photogravuresofa00atla
The Hathi Trust Digital Library also presents the whole volume
http://hdl.handle.net/2027/loc.ark:/13960/t8ff4hx3s
The Good of It (1902) by Edward Twichell Ware, President of Atlanta University, was subtitled: "how it pays to give higher education to Negroes—being some account of what graduates of Atlanta University are doing for the uplifting of their race." No publisher was listed. (The Library of Congress entry does not specify a definite publisher). The book of 24 pages described the various occupations of the graduates from the school, presenting in many cases photos of the places of their employment. DuBois was not mentioned by name, but note the following description of the University's "Sociological Work", as it was labeled in the text:
    The University makes a specialty of the careful, scientific investigation of the social, educational, economic, and moral conditions of the Negro population, for the double purpose of supplying accurate information to students of social problems everywhere, and especially, for aiding and stimulating its graduates in efforts for social betterment. This work of Atlanta University has been highly commended by the London Spectator and the Southern History Association.  [p.22]
The entire volume is available at the Internet Archive
http://www.archive.org/details/goodofithowitpay00ware
The Hathi Trust Digital Library also provides the entire volume
http://hdl.handle.net/2027/loc.ark:/13960/t0gt6bs9g



LATER SECONDARY SOURCES
Black Enterprise magazine (June 1980) used Du Bois's The Negro in Business to introduce an article detailing three case studies of successful African American businesspersons. The article was entitled "The Changing Tradition". The particular author of each case was explicitly acknowledged at the end of each of the three sections; however, the introductory section containing the Du Bois reference did not mention any specific author. That introduction follows verbatim and in its entirety:
    In 1899, Atlanta University published a landmark study, "The Negro ln Business," the first attempt to assess the scope of black involvement in the free enterprise system in the 35 years since Emancipation. The study, edited by W. E. B. DuBois, reveals that, then as now, black aspirations for a share of the country's wealth could not be totally repressed by discrimination and political disadvantage.
    DuBois estimated that there were at least 5,000 black businesses in the country at the time of the study. Most of the 1,906 which responded to his extensive survey were located in the South, but 407 black entrepreneurs had gone west of the Mississippi, including 43 in California, 10 in the state of Washington, and 8 in Colorado.
    Not surprisingly, many of the businesses on the list were descended from skills learned in slavery. Valets became barbers; cooks became caterers, and storehouse keepers were transformed into storeowners. Many businesses were created to meet the needs of blacks living under strict segregation: undertakers, saloons, hotels, and restaurants. But there were also publishers, printers, druggists, wagonmakers, and blacksmiths. DuBois reported the existence of four black banks, several insurance companies, and 13 building and loan associations.
    "For a Negro to go into business means a great deal," wrote DuBois. "It is indeed a step in social progress worth measuring. It means hard labor, thrift in savings, a comprehension of social movements. and ability to learn a new vocation—all this taking place, not by concerted guided action, but spontaneously here and there, in hamlet and city, North and South."
    Four score years later, the words of DuBois continue to ring true. Black business has gone through cycles of prosperity and hard times. But those traditional businesses that prosper today have had to adjust to new political and economic circumstances that DuBois might not have imagined in l899. But he surely would have recognized the resilience and resourcefulness of these business people.  [p.198]
Page 198 in Faith C. Christmas and Clinton Cox, "The Changing Tradition," Black Enterprise, v.10, n.11 (June 1980): pp.198-200, 202, 204, 207.
http://books.google.com/books?id=qyQAUdgjPXMC...pg=PA198....
"W.E.B. Du Bois and the Atlanta Sociological Laboratory" by Earl Wright II (2005). Wright argues that at Atlanta University Du Bois established what was likely the first school of American sociology. Wright discusses the tenets of a "sociological school" and applies them to the Atlanta Sociological Laboratory.
At Sociation Today, Vol.3, No.1 (Spring 2005) [the online academic journal
of the North Caroina Sociological Association]
http://www.ncsociology.org/sociationtoday/v31/wright.htm
Born and Bred: The Making of a 21st Century College-Bred African-American: A Reexamination of Atlanta University's 1910 Study "The College-Bred Negro American" Edited by W. E. B. Du Bois, Ph.D., and Augustus Granville Dill, A.M. is a thesis written by Michael E. Carter for a Master of Liberal Studies degree at the University of South Florida (2007). Carter provides an overview of the 1910 AUP and also discusses the educational theories of Booker T. Washington, Du Bois, and Carter G. Woodson. Carter also sets down an autobiographical account of his own education and his discussions with students about college education. Lastly, he delineates a proposal for a study to replicate the 1910 AUP, presumably to be conducted at a later date.
Available in PDF format at Scholar Commons, University of South Florida (Catalog Page).
http://scholarcommons.usf.edu/etd/659
"Deferred Legacy! The Continued Marginalization of the Atlanta Sociological Laboratory" by Earl Wright II (Sociology Compass, 2/1 (2008): 195-207). The abstract in full states:
 Between 1895 and 1917 the Atlanta Sociological Laboratory made substantial contributions to the discipline of sociology, including the establishment of the first American school of sociology, institutionalization of method triangulation, institutionalization of the insider researcher, and institutionalization of the public acknowledgment of one's research. Despite these contributions that predate the Chicago School, the W. E. B. Du Bois led laboratory remains in the margins of American sociological discourse. This paper examines the contributions of the Atlanta Sociological Laboratory, offers explanations for the school's more than 100-year marginalization and examines its legacy in the discipline.
Available at Dr. Earl Wright II's web site (PDF)
http://earlwright2.com/..../docs/Wright_Deferred.153120159.pdf
Dr. Earl Wright II, is an Associate Professor in the Department of African and African American Studies at the University of Cincinnati (faculty page). In addition to the articles on Du Bois and the Atlanta Sociological Laboratory cited above, he has published other relavant academic work, which he provides on his web site as downloadable PDFs files:
* "The Tradition of Sociology at Fisk University." Journal of African American Studies, 14:1 (2010): 44-60.
* "Beyond W.E.B. Du Bois: A Note on Some of the Lesser Known Members of the Atlanta Sociological Laboratory." Sociological Spectrum, 29:6 (2009): 700-717.
* (With Thomas C. Calhoun). "Jim Crow Sociology: Toward An Understanding of the Origin and Principles of Black Sociology Via the Atlanta Sociological Laboratory." Sociological Focus, 39:1 (2006): 1-18.
* "W.E.B. Du Bois and the Atlanta University Studies on the Negro, Revisited." Journal of African American Studies, 9:4 (2006): 3-17.
* "The Atlanta Sociological Laboratory, 1896-1924: A Historical Account of the First American School of Sociology." Western Journal of Black Studies, 26:3 (2002): 165-174.
* "Why Black People Tend To Shout!: An Earnest Attempt To Explain the Sociological Negation of the Atlanta Sociological Laboratory Despite Its Possible Unpleasantness." Sociological Spectrum, 22:3 (2002): 325-361.
* "Using The Master's Tools: Atlanta University and American Sociology, 1896-1924." Sociological Spectrum, 22:1 (2002): 15-39.
Dr. Earl Wright II's web site
http://earlwright2.com/home
Shennette Garrett-Scott presented "A Historiography of African American Business" at the 2009 Business History Conference (program). She discussed the Atlanta University Conferences and their relevant publications. In particular, she indicated the significance of The Negro in Business (AUP-4) and Some Efforts of American Negroes For their Own Social Betterment (AUP-3) by situating Du Bois's studies within the wider scope of research on Black business. As she stated in the conference paper's abstract:
 While scholars are certainly aware that African American businesses existed, few are aware of the established and growing body of scholarship focused on this important field of business history. Since the late 1890s, scholars have interrogated the complex intersections of race and business. African American business historiography has taken a circuitous route; this essay attempts to periodize that historiography. It identifies five major periods and the major themes and points of contention within and between each period: Black Self-Determination, 1890s-1915; Golden Age of the Black Economic Nationalism, 1915-1935; Progressive Critique of Black Business, 1935-1960s; Black Political Economy, 1970-1980s; and Revisionist Period, 1990s to Present. The essay considers why African American business has been slower to materialize in relation to other areas of scholarship outside the field of business history—and within it. Finally, it offers conjectures about the future of the historiography of African American business.
Shennette Garrett-Scott: "A Historiography of African American Business" [418K PDF file]
www.thebhc.org/publications/BEHonline/2009/garrett-scott.pdf



VIEWING DjVu
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